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, this law is just another example of obama's war on religion. which he cleverly passed in 1954. (laughter) but now some brave religious leaders have banded together to fight for their right to partyfy fill united nations. >> stephen: some one thousand pastors nationwide are preparing to deliver a sermon the i.r.s. may not want to hear. they're trying to draw attention to a 1954 tax code that prohibits tax-exempt organizations like churches from engaging in political endorsements a group known as the i ay lines defending freedom is now challenging the code claiming it violates preacher's right for free speech. >> they've marched october 7 as pulpit freedom sunday. >> yes, pulpit freedom sunday. when the thrill of lengthy sermons finally meets the excitement of tax policy. pulpit freedom sunday is the boldest theological movement since casual good friday. this sunday, october 7 pastors around the united states will violate the law by directly endorsing one of the candidates. it doesn't matter which, either romney or not-obama. (laughter) and to try to force this issue into court the sermons
because state courts decide the vast majority of the country's legal cases. for "religion & ethics newsweekly," i'm lucky severson in des moines, iowa. >>> in many parts of the country, poor people do not have access to fresh food. such areas are known as food deserts. we have a story today from judy valente about churches and communities in new orleans that are growing their own fresh food and otherwise doing what they can to create what they call food justice. >> this garden is the result of a lot of blood, sweat and tears and hard work in a neighborhood that a bunch of folks had given up on. >> reporter: community activist nat turner is surveying a site people rarely see in the battered ninth ward of new orleans. his community garden provides fruits and vegetables to people hard pressed to find fresh produce in these parts. >> anybody in the neighborhood can come by and some time this morning somebody's going to stop by and say, "you got any okra? you got any creole tomatoes? you got some bell peppers? you got whatever?" and some people just come by the garden and if they want t
scholars on issues of religion and culture and politics. and the washington bureau chief, a seasoned observer of our politics. with these two gentlemen at our assistance today, we will take a broader look at how the arab world is looking at the united states in the u.s. public is looking at the arab world as the arab awakening continues to create a very uncertain and fast-changing environment. i am grateful to all of you for coming. i look forward to our discussions. i like to invite him up to the podium to present the poll. >> thank you. it is always good to be here. i am going to present not the whole thing but some of the findings we can get on with. i want to give you a little bit of a picture about this particular poll. it was conducted by a number of networks that is designed to be a national representative of an international panel. the methodologies described in the information that will be put out is also available online. i want to say it is my pleasure and honor to partner this program, a program for international policy attitudes, particularly my colleague. he has a recen
in england. you present yourself as a secular muslim. but one trying to understand the religion and your role in it. >> i mean i grew up in a family in which there was very little religion. my father wasn't religious at all. but he was really interested in the subject of, you know, the birth and growth of islam. he basically transmitted that interest to me. so when i studied history at cambridge, i did a special subject in that exactly. while i was studying it was where i came across the so-called incident of the satanic verses. >> brown: you say in the book you noted good story. >> 20 years later i find out how good a story it was. >> brown: you wrote when you finished the satanic verses you thought it was the least political of the novels you had written at the time. you were genuinely surprised at what had happened. >> i thought i was very respectful about islam. yes from a secular point of view but it talks about the birth of this religion and i thought it was pretty admiring of the person at the center of it, the prophet of islam. >> brown: what did you think you were doing? what did you
's no question of religion, of color of skin, or anything like that. people can be all beautiful. it depends on who they are, but it is not a question of color. for me, both of us were beautiful. and i loved color. color of the skin. tattoo on the skin, which is a kind of color. some blue colors that you add. and i wanted to show that. when i started, i remember that there were some beautiful girls. they're beautiful. but i felt like, ok, but there is also beauty. i have a girlfriend which was modeling for me that i met very early when i started that was from a french colony. she was beautiful and black and very inspiring, very nice. i say, yes, why not. for me, a difference was beautiful. they looked to me, and i wanted to show it. another kind of different was the fact that when i saw farida, i said, my god, she is incredible. i was very impressed by her beauty. very frightened even by her beauty. she was kind of a very arrogant imperial. and african and beauty with a special expression. not arrogant. but beautiful. i said, i want to show this girl which is different. does not know how to
of the religion. the religion of the book is not called islam. it is very heavily fictionalized. >> have you ever regretted writing it? >> i have been asked this question once a week for 24 years. the answer will always be no. i think it is a good buck. -- good book. people are finally being able to read it as a novel. young people, they are just coming to it fresh. some people love it, some people do not like it. >> you did not have an ordinary life. you were in hiding. you had an alias. what was your state of mind? >> very up and down. the first couple of years were very difficult. going back and looking at my journals at that time, which i have not looked at since then, it is quite obvious the person writing the journal's is very often in a state of the depression. it got easier, i felt, once i was able to begin to organize some kind of political resistance and develop a campaign with the help of a couple of human rights organizations and france to try to put pressure on european and -- your pet -- european governments to put pressure on the iranians. >> in this book, the heroes seem to be yor
the to religion as well as to education and the politics. that is why president obama is not embarrassed to say, as he says in his second book, the audacity of hope, that he believes a living constitution. the phrase, and to a large extent the idea come from wilson . that turn sounds so green, so natural, so organic. one of those averments the laws that republicans are always opposing. that's a deliberate distraction. a living constitution, the principle of the constitution is not natural selection but artificial selection. the theory is are the reasoning is we have a call to the point where we can control our own evolution, we can take charge of society's development as a whole , so the living constitution, as they both, i think, would describe it, is really a mandate for experts to take charge of government, to experiment on the sovereign people rather than simply represent them, to build a new state and breed, as it were, a new people. it is constitutional eugenics. amid that seem a -- flex of a living constitution unless changes the law of light, it is puzzling and revealing to discover tha
. according to all profits and all religions and faiths, it's forbidden and it's a very ugly behavior. how can you, in order to obtain four or five additional votes or to make a party more popular than the other -- allow me, sir. allow me. >> do you believe that homosexual people, are they born homosexual or do they become homosexual? what do you believe? >> they become at the end of the day, they do become that way. you see the problems that are facing humanity today are much different than whether a single woman goes skiing or not. there are many reforms yet to take place. many reforms as to be realized. is america a poor country? they are human beings, too. each one of them is a complete human being with many hopes and aspirations and dreams. throughout the world, 1.2 billion people live in utter poverty. dictatorships exists, and denying human dignity exists, unfortunately, and all of it must be reformed. >> when i hear this, i like you speaking like this, this is great, but shouldn't freedom and individuality and all those things also extend to people who just happen to be gay, and they w
is the congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion or the free exercise and stay out of it and leave people alone when it comes to their religion obviously assumes the religion. they believe in god. so i'm not going to revise history to pretend that. i grew up in a religious environment and i am proud of it. i was into the priest. i'm proud of that. i would probably enormously angry right now. so i am grateful for my faith and on and on apologetic about it. >> this is pretty remarkable we started talking a little bit about how it has changed over time. we could have also added to the 19th amendment and women becoming a part of this part of the democratic inclusion. [laughter] but most of the amendments have made it more perfect. they got rid of it. >> ausley understand. >> it is pretty extraordinary. the constitution frees up every american to be eligible for public office, and there is no religious test and that wasn't the prominent feature of the state constitutions. a lot of them actually had religious tests. >> you have the establishment in religion. so, on a unde
scratcher. a letter written by albert einstein containing his thoughts on religion. he calls it primitive legend. bidding begins at a whopping, get this, $3 million. >>> play-off baseball, a historic night in the nfl for drew brees. check this out. a monster pileup at nascar's talladega super speedways. >>> all the cold airheading for the middle of the country will miss the west coast. your forecast is coming up. you're watching "early today." >>> very good morning to you. in sports, drew brees's record-setting night led the new orleans saints to their first win of the season. brees broke johnny unitas's 52-year-old record by throwing a touchdown pass his 48th straight game. it was a 40-yard strike to devery henderson in the fourth quarter. brees threw for 370 yards and four touchdowns to beat the san diego chargers 24-21. here now is an early look at all of sunday's nfl scores. games of note, the colts scored a touchdown in the final seconds for a stunning comeback win over the packers. tom brady won the battle of the marquee quarterbacks, leading the patriots to a 31-21 victory over pey
: still among the overwhelming support for the girls there are signs that some believe religion has no place here including 2005 graduate lindsay. >> once you start doing it it's a slippery slope. here it's a very big christian community but what if somebody came out and wanted to put out a scripture from the koran or torah on it. would it get the same positive reaction? you do it for one group you have to do it for everybody. >> if the judge says you can't do this any more what would it be like for you >> it would be crushing to our team and to the football team and to many of our citizens. >>> a football game sparked trouble in morgantown, west virginia. fans celebrating a victory started more than 40 fires in the street or in trash containers. five people were arrested. that kind of thing happens out there. coming up after your local news on cbs "this morning" newly uncovered audiotapes of president nixon's private conversations. i'm terrell brown. this is the morning news. president nixon's private conversations. i'm terrell brown. this is the morning news. and boost. ergent the
amendment to call the members of a particular religion savages. i have no dogs in this hunt, but the ad for israel does not pass muster. it just insults the followers or islam. this is progress? well no, john, it's not exactly progress. i have to ask you, what would it mean if the judge ruled the opposite way? would it be progress to say that ads could be banned because people don't like the message? i've never been sure where we should draw those lines, is most of the time, i argue the courts are right to err on the side of more speech, not less. and then there was this on the hit that took out robert griffin, iii, in yesterday's redskins game. craig from king george, virginia, said that hit was illegal. griffin was sliding feet first when weatherspoon slammed his shoulder into the left side of his helmet. weatherspoon could have tackled rg3, but chose to launch at griffin's head. after bounty gate, it will be interesting to see how the commissioner handles this. you are the only person i've heard or seen that says that hit wasn't legal. in the eyes of the officials, griffin was like a
support capital holding rather than human values. according to all prophets and all religions and faith homosexuality is strictly forbidden. it's a very ugly behavior. how can you in order to obtain four or five additional votes or make a party more popular than the other how can you. allow me. >> do you believe that homosexual people, are they born homosexual or do they become homosexual? what do you believe? >> translator: they become. at the end of the day they do become that way. i'm not seeing any root causes of it. the problems that are facing humanity today are much deeper than whether a single lady goes skiing or not. there are many reforms to take place, many reforms. in the united states 50 million people live in poverty. the ameriis america a poor coun? they are human beings to do. they have many hopes and aspirations. 1.2 billion people live in utter poverty. dictatorships do exist. denying human dignity exists. all of this must be reformed. >> when i hear you -- >> translator: allow you. >> i like you speaking like this. this is great. shouldn't freedom and individuality an
. i got my name. he discusses his views on religion. the auction closes october 18th. >> do you think $3 million is high? >> seems like it. are his letters at that rare? >> seems strange, because there was that beatles print, was it a print only going for like $100,000. >> yeah. >> does seem strange. >> not that we're saying -- >> no, not at all. but precious document. >> the letter is significant because it does contain some controversial views about religion. remember, he was a scientist. believed certain things. there you go. >> we'll see how much it fetches. >> to pronounce, today is columbus day. >> columbus. yes. >> easy one. >> gwen, want to tell everybody about something. we have video to show you about people in minnesota. this is not from last year. this is now. earliest open of this resort. two weeks ago the water slide was open there. more than a foot of snow has dropped in some areas. >> was the water slide super cold? >> i don't know. >> might have been. >> ski lovers unite. >> do you ski, gwen. >> yes. >> i guess, california a canadian. >> beautiful places in canada, by
parking meter thing, you know what? religion aside, least one day of the week it would be nice if san francisco city government was off the backs of everyday residents. [ applause ] >> i like that. thank you. >> all right. next question. san francisco's transportation inserve drivers, bicyclists and transit uses. bicyclists are not charged for the privilege of using or parking on public roadways. mr. davis, mr. everett and miss selby should the city assess fees on bicycle owners to pay for transportation improvements? >> i don't think so and i will tell you why because the city is moving in a direction that i think they should be which is encouraging more people to get out of their cars and to get onto bikes and to use our streets and walk the streets. you know, i think we need to be visionary about getting and meeting our goals. we have a goal of 20% of all trips in san francisco being taken on a bike by 2020. the bike coalition, which is one of my endorsements, as well district 5 group have been advocating for this connecting the city plan, the bike coalition for cross town bikew
than the politics, religion, sexual preference, something that goes to the very soul. you bought that? it is remarkable. >> do you still paint? >> not enough. it is one of the things i keep -- i have space to do it at home. i have all the materials to do it, but i am lacking the focus of being able to separate my work from my other life. that is one area in which i am weakest. >> if we saw you in your personal life, doing things that you enjoy more than anything else, what would we see? >> well, there are two kinds of enjoyment. there is the tortured kind, writing, but there is no greater kick, i find, than writing something, and no greater torture at the same time. it would be writing something or drawing and painting. >> what can you tell us about your wife? where did you meet her? >> i met her when i was london bureau chief. i remember the day, july 4, 1968. cronkite and betsy, walter and a betsy cronkite were coming to london. i cannot remember why. i had been invited to a july 4 evening. a friend of mine, the husband was american, the wife was british. the fellow -- walter had ca
, religion, native tongue, ethnic background should create differences or distances to people, or nor should it bring people together. it has always been like this. >> when we come back, a question i promise you mahmoud ahmadinejad has never been requested before. >> i ask every guest one question and i will ask you, just because i am amused by your response, how many times in your life, mr. president, you have been properly in love? i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus liquid gels speeds relief to your worst cold symptoms plus has a decongestant for your stuffy nose. thanks. that's the cold truth! boproductivity up, costs down, thtime to market reduced... those are good things. upstairs, they will see fantasy. not fantasy... logistics. ups came in, analyzed our supply chain, inventory systems... ups? ups. not fantasy? who would have thought? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. we know you. we know you have to rise early... and work late, with not enough sleep in b
it to anyone in need, any religion. when that earthquake hit 80 relief from mormons got there before government halted. after hurricane katrina, the same deal. even the new york times reported that. the mormon trucks were the first to arrive. tvs said the efficiency of the mormon welfare apparatus is legendary. the trucks were there before the national guard even allow the relief through. the response is incredibly fast an incredibly efficient. when people need help we should stop automatically thinking that governme
their religion is telling them to strap bombs. would you tell them to strap bombs on and -- >> we have nobody to talk to. we are not talking to anybody. we never talk to anybody. you have people in washington, sean, that doesn't know what -- >> the system is broken. the head person who happens to be the president has to get everybody in the room and make deals. we make deals we don't talk we don't talk to anybody. the world can seem broken because of our lack of leadership. >> reagan and clinton had a relationship with congress. obama doesn't have a relationship with this. >> coming up next what does donald trump think about the romney ryan ticket we will find out right after this. >> this is amanda one of the stars of the apprentice. she works here and does a fantastic job. >> this is yvonne kau doing a tremendous job. she is working mostly on durel in miami. it will be an amazing place very shortly. this is sean hannity's crew. sha sean is one of my favorite people on television as you know. special man. sean is actually a special man. >> i watch him a lot. i think he's great. he's got it.
will be seeing and hearing a lot of ads. >> question 6 does not in any way interfere with my religion, it doesn't threaten my catholic faith, and it is the right thing to do for all marylanders. on november 6th, please vote for question 6. >> reporter: this is the new web ad for marylanders for marriage equality. they want to reach the washington audience and sent out this urgent e-mail today asking supporters to donate whatever they can. they are also bringing out some big names. >> tonight the governor is going to be meeting with brendan ayanbadejo, baltimore ravens linebacker and supporters. they'll be watching a football game and having the time to thank supporters. >> ravens center matt burk is against gay marriage and the most influential group in this debate may be the clergy. >> absolutely critical. the preachers, the clergy, throughout prince george's county and surrounding parts are critical in this fight. >> while we've heard from the clergy on both sides of the issue, some understand question 6 is really about equality, about fairness, and everybody should be treated equally under t
religions and what's the extent of the space and hostility among the religions, how are matchal resources distributed -- natural resources distributed. it's generally not a good idea for all of the resources to be found only in one part of a large country. and things like that. so i don't want to overestimate the importance of constitutions or, therefore, to say, well, here's a constitution that's really worked because, no doubt, there would be examples when it didn't. let me be truly heretical and say that one of the things i like about many state constitutions -- and you find these especially as you move west, but not only in the west -- is the degree to can they allow some element of direct democracy. the united states constitution, 1787, was written by people who, not to put too fine a point on it, were fundamentally mistrustful to their core of democracy. james madison writes very proudly in the 63rd federalists that although the constitution is ordained in the name of we the people, that will be the last time the people speak more or less directly. otherwise they will speak exclusiv
values in regard to the family, to religion. >> abortion. >> abortion. issues on that. >> gay marriage. they're very conservative. that's basically what changed everything. i remember reading an article where president bush was asked what was one of his biggest regrets. he said, not passing immigration reform. as a republican and having a republican congress he could not convince his own party to support immigration reform. we focus only on the undocumented immigrants. i think that that's -- that that's what's happening, that when people perceive latinos, first thing that pops into their mind is immigrants and undocumented immigrants or like they say illegal aliens which is a term we don't like to use. they don't realize that 74% are americans, are citizens either by birth or naturalized. so the majority of latinos are americans and we have a buying power of over a trillion dollars. if latinos in the u.s. were a country, we would be the 14th largest economy in the world. they're 2.5 billion businesses that are latino owned. we are a very important part of this country. we contribute ve
of making this about fear, fear about your religion being taken away, fear of unrest, fear of -- i guess they haven't quite played the gay marriage card yet, but they are basically saying like things are going to get worse, if you don't vote for us things will get worse, whereas the obama team says we think we can do this. we hope you believe us. please vote with us and we're going to make this better. and i do wonder which is going to work the best. i mean, we see some small upticks in optimism about the country. maybe that's a good thing for obama, but, you know, fear is not necessarily a losing card to play, and definitely they have doubled down on it and here i'm continuing to just go with metaphors as strong as i can. sorry. >> those are perfect. thank you both. >>> next, big bird shows us why debates really do matter. stay with us. >> we think he's probably going to come at me like a cannonball. more pressure because mitt romney put on such a great performance that the bar is pretty high. there's also pressure because joe biden has been doing this for 40 years. [ man ] ring ring...
embassies. we will defend, also, the constitutional rights of speech and assembly and religion. the attacks on libya and egypt underscored that the world remains a dangerous place and that american leadership is still sorely needed. in the face of this violence, america cannot shrink from the responsibility to lead the. megyn: that was governor romney raising some questions about security in and the day after our attack on our consulate. the benghazi consulate that was involved in the killing of ambassador stevens and others. this guy in libya is speaking out. his name is lieutenant colonel andrew wood. he is saying that security in libya, in the weeks ahead of the attack, when those on the ground at the state department for more help, the state department actually cut security staffing. >> i feel like we were being asked to play the piano with two fingers. there was concern amongst the entire embassy staff. i had people come and ask me that as well. they asked -- they asked what was going to happen. i can only answer that what we are being told is that they are working on it. but they will
, wet seal losing merchandising ahead to competitor true religion. up a penny. and the flying pigs people, zynga cut their outlook on friday, where is it now? drop last week, down a fraction at 2.46. that means its ipo is down 8% from the ipo price. and facebook gets more than 10% of money from fees paid by zynga and facebook is at $20 a share. general motors says chinese sales up close to 2% over last year and gm now at $24 a share. and here is another big name you know, it's honda and it's recalling 489,000 crv suv's in the u.s. and europe. and there's a fire risk, apparently and honda stock is at 30. all right, the dow is now down 51. most people, you've heard it before. small businesses are the engine of growth in this country. we'll tell you just how many of them think president obama is actually holding them back. [ male announcer ] how do you trade? with scottrader streaming quotes, any way you want. fully customize it for your trading process -- from thought to trade, on every screen. and all in real time. which makes it just like having your own trading floor, right at you
seems incomprehensible. the obama statement. we made it clear that the cand dates religion is out of the bounds. this is categorically false. how do you respond? >> i receive aid second call the following sunday looking for my son who is away at college. the caller asked for thim and would like to know how he would vote. they were from the obama campaign . i replied the same thing. he is a practicing catholic and would not vote for a president who disrespects our catholic faith. and the caller said i am a practicing catholic and i support obama. and i said are you not familiar with the nonnegotiablable. she said how can you support mitt romney who doesn't believe in jesus christ. the next thing you ask me about the nuns on the best and why are you calling me and looking for my college age children and telling them you -- things are not true . they said you told me that you are no catholic. >> gretchen: that is part of the campaign push. joy allen thank you for your time. >> thank you very much. >> gretchen: one weekend and two new record highs. gas prices are jumping 10 percent a
african-americans, speed up execution, welcome religion into the public sphere and, above all, um, reverse roe v. wade and allow states once again to ban abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution, um, was the arrival in washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted to work in that, on behalf of that agenda. who were two of the best and brightest of that group? john roberts and samuel alito. 197 finish -- in 1985 in a memo plotting litigation strategy at the solicitor general's office, alito wrote: what can be made of this opportunity to advance the goal of bringing about the eventual overruling of roe v. wade? later that year applying for a promotion he wrote: i am particularly proud of my contributions to recent cases in which the government has argued in the supreme court that the constitution does not protect the right to an abortion. samuel alito then, samuel alito now. but the republican party of 1980 was not the republican party of today either, and we saw that in re began's nominations to the -- reagan's nominations to the supreme court. 1981, pott
at me as their child. they did not look at my race, my gender, my orientation, my religion. they saw me as one of their own and they made sure i had food on my table and a roof over my head. philatelists time for me to go to college, people -- when it was time to go to college, people knew the most valuable resource was not the oil in the ground, it was the genius of children and folks put dollar bills in envelopes. to help me go to college. at college, they didn't just tell me stories. i had the privilege of being the commencement speaker for my mom's university at her 50th reunion and this is the frustrating thing about mama's -- she looked at me and i don't know what is about mothers. you could become a grown man at 40 years old and be the mayor of the city and they still treat you like your 12. [laughter] [applause] she said to me at that dinner, come here, boy and started pulling me around. and i'm like i'm the mayor, bomb. you are ruining my image. and she took me from table to table and said you have to meet these folks. this is the person that rent our voter registration drive.
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)

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